What are the Main Problems with Composite Doors?

It’s not so long ago that the UK went a bit mad for those delightful white uPVC doors. That was around the very same time that shoulder pads and mullets appeared like a good concept too!

Luckily, for the majority of us anyhow, times have carried on, and together with mullets and shoulder pads, bog-standard white uPVC doors are no longer our first choice!

Today, composite doors (and hipsters, regretfully) are all the rage. In this case of doors, the composite range are likely to be here to stay. What exactly are they, what are their benefits and are there any problems with composite doors? On this page we’ll have a look at those concerns in greater information …

Composite Doors: The Basics

Composite ought to provide you an excellent beginning point when it comes to the ‘what’ question. Different to uPVC doors (made purely of plastic) composite doors are made with a range of different products.

This is designed to make them sturdy, long-lasting, safe and secure and more appealing than a plain old plastic door.

Composite Doors: The Manufacturing Process

As mentioned before, composite doors are developed using a variety of materials. These are glued and pressed together under high pressure.

This consists of: timber from sustainable sources, glass-reinforced plastic, and sometimes metal too.

The process produces a much more powerful, thicker door, which provides much better security and better insulating residential or commercial properties than old-school uPVC.

In addition to this, a composite door will also have a PVC subframe and hardwood inner frame, which supports the general structure, making it resistant to all kinds of weather condition, and far more powerful and more safe.

Unlike UPVC doors, their composite cousins contain a layer of polyurethane foam within, enhancing their thermal performance; a need to if you live in more Northerly parts of the country, where harsh Winters are the guideline rather than the exception.

Problems with Composite Doors

There aren’t many issues with composite doors, however if you’re a D.I.Y lover, they may not be the easiest to handle. They’re extremely weighty – thanks to their strong building.

If you want to fit them yourself, it’ll be at least a two-person job. Usually speaking, it’s suggested to have the door fitted by a professional company for the best outcomes.

One other minor downside of this door type is that they are slightly more expensive than UPVC equivalents; primarily due to the truth that they are made from numerous various materials, and consequently, take longer to make.

Less expensive options typically, in the long-term, prove to be an incorrect economy. If you get a quote for your new front door that seems to good to be true then it most likely is-and is not likely to last as long as a door made from quality products.

Some property owners also talk about how their composite doors take a lot of effort and upkeep to preserve. While to a certain degree this holds true, they are definitely far much easier to maintain than traditional wood-which is prone to decaying and warping.

Sometimes, Choice Can Be a Bad Thing!

Option, colour and style is all very well, but once you’ve made the option, you will have to stick with it. If you change the colour scheme of your home, it’ll be tough to change the colour of the door!

The very same applies to plain old uPVC naturally, which will remain decidedly unattractive, whatever you do to your home.

Highly engineered and designed, composite doors and frames truly require some proficiency when it pertains to fitting. Some consumers have fallen nasty when ordering “cheap” doors from unskilled fitters.

Splitting in the system, bowing or draughty frames can all be the outcome. Don’t select cheap over experienced when sourcing a composite door installer/supplier.

Post Sponsored by Eccles Glazing – Your Local Boarding Up Specialist.

 

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